About

You're viewing one of 40,737 blog entries. Click here to read some more.

Other views

Recent Comments
Comments By...
Last 100 Entries
Read Chronologically
Random Entry
Random Image
View by Category
Mobile Edition


Ad

Advertise Here



Friday, 14 October, 2011

How The Post Office Will Survive
(with comments)

In Connecticut: Post office charges family postage for block party invites.

random mailbox The Sickles, of East Hampton, thought nothing of slipping notes in the neighbors' mailboxes about an upcoming Halloween block party, until the U.S. Postal service stepped in.

The couple had no idea it's against postal code regulations to leave notices in  residential mailboxes unless they have postage.

The U.S. Postal service charged the Sickles 44 cents for postage for all 80 invites they placed around their Royal Oak neighborhood.

"One Monday I had a note it is illegal to put these in mailboxes.  Day 2 I had a bill for assumed 80 in the box, times 44 cents for the stamp," said Jeff Sickle. "I haven't paid it yet. I'm trying to have the conversation that no one is willing to have."

That's $35.20 the Post Office wouldn't have earned. It probably cost them $350 to investigate it and do the billing, but that's how things work at the Post Office.


Permalink | Posted in General |

- Reader Comments -

Following are comments in response to this item.
The most recent comment is at the bottom.

  1. By Doug. Comment posted 14-Oct-2011 @07:54am:
    Even Jehovah Witnesses know you can't do that and have to bang on someone's door repeatedly before jamming the tract into the door crack.
  2. By Jake Djibouti. Comment posted 14-Oct-2011 @09:06am:
    All they are being asked to pay is the postage. They should be thankful they are not being fined or charged with a federal offense.
  3. By J-Walk. Comment posted 14-Oct-2011 @09:29am:
    They should be thankful they are not being fined or charged with a federal offense.

    Can they do that with no solid evidence? Anybody could have printed up some invitations, put somebody else's address on them, and stuck them in the mailboxes.
  4. By Bisbonian. Comment posted 14-Oct-2011 @09:32am:
    All they are being asked to pay is the postage.


    To cover the cost that the Post Office incurred for the manpower and time to physically deliver the notices, as well as the original purchase, installation, maintenance, and depreciation to all those mailboxes.
  5. By banjo brad. Comment posted 14-Oct-2011 @09:59am:
    as well as the original purchase, installation, maintenance, and depreciation to all those mailboxes.


    It is the property owner's responsibility to purchase, install and maintain their mailbox. The only requirement is that it meet USPS specifications.
  6. By Liz. Comment posted 14-Oct-2011 @10:29am:
    "To cover the cost that the Post Office incurred for the manpower and time to physically deliver the notices"

    The post office didn't deliver them, the family put them into everyones mail box.

    Post cards cost $0.29 for "small" and $0.44 for "large." I wonder if the USPS measured them or assumed they were the large size.
  7. By Bisbonian. Comment posted 14-Oct-2011 @10:31am:
    Guess I need to put <sarcasm> tags around that...I thought it was pretty obvious.
  8. By Bisbonian. Comment posted 14-Oct-2011 @10:33am:
    In other words, the Post Office is recovering the cost of...absolutely nothing.
  9. By Carl. Comment posted 14-Oct-2011 @11:11am:
    I used to deliver a morning newspaper motor route (remember newspapers?). Sometimes people would put flyers in the paper tubes, which annoys the carrier because he has to stop and investigate, because the object seen in the tube might be a payment or a communication from the customer. My policy when I found a "foreign object" in a paper tube was to take it out and throw it away. The tube is usually the property of the newspaper, so they can control what is put in it.
  10. By soubriquet. Comment posted 14-Oct-2011 @11:33am:
    Here in britain we don't have mailboxes like you do. just a letter slot in our front door. It belongs to us, some have a box or basket for the mail to fall into, most don't. (it drops onto the floor). The post office does not own them, nor has it any say in who uses them. Our morning papers go threough them, notes from the neighbour, local business's fliers, and so on. Oh. and the postman delivers to your door. Not just the end of your driveway.

    I'm kind of bemused that your post office has the right to say what's allowed to go into a box that you, not they, own.
  11. By Thrash Cardiom. Comment posted 14-Oct-2011 @12:32pm:
    What a stupid law.
  12. By deciBelcat. Comment posted 14-Oct-2011 @02:35pm:
    Guess I need to put <sarcasm> tags around that...I thought it was pretty obvious.


    Readers today are quite lazy. They can't tell what's humor or sarcasm without seeing some kind of a symbol or an emoticon. I don't remember ever seeing an emoticon in the writings of Moliere, Shaw, Twain, Parker, Thurber, Rogers, or any number of other sarcastic and/or witty writers, yet their stuff was widely recognized by the general public for what it was.
  13. By Maven. Comment posted 14-Oct-2011 @08:55pm:
    deciBelcat:

    Not to put down Bisbonian (since I did recognize his post as sarcasm), but the authors you quote were quite skilled at their craft, and thus we *should* be able to recognize their intent to skewer. Most posters on a blog comments page on the other hand...
  14. By deciBelcat. Comment posted 14-Oct-2011 @10:02pm:
    I'm sticking with what I said, as back in the day, even the sucky humorists and satirists didn't use emoticons.
Commenting is not available in this weblog entry.