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Friday, 28 January, 2011

Homeschooling Detailed
(with comments)

I spent about 30 minutes at this site, and I'll probably go back for more. It's jaw-droppingly fascinating. An anonymous woman describes how she homeschools her daughter, Hannah, in a rambling and often incoherent page (with lots of additional links): Biblical Scholarship.

The only text book is the Bible -- the King James Bible. Accept no substitutes.

I began praying, fasting, and working with my daughter when she was an infant--I did not know that I was going to homeschool. I did know that I wanted her to know Jesus through his word. In those early days, all we had was the scriptures, a tambourine, and a hymn book.

Hannah read her first words at 20 months and was reading the Authorized King James Bible responsively with me at 4 years old.The earlier a child can read, the earlier they can read the scriptures. Before Hannah was 6.5 years old, I knew that her schooling was essentially complete (Year 2 of formal school). Subsequent years have proven this to be true.

axial skeleton Even though her schooling was essentially complete, she kept at it. For example, she studied advanced topics like astrology:

Unsurprisingly, heliocentrist experiments to prove the motion of the earth have FAILED. These experiments have been deliberately ignored by universities because they support geocentricity. But a disciple does not need all this proof. A disciple ONLY needs the scriptures to prove to him what is true.

For details not covered in the Bible, hand-drawn materials were used, like the image shown here, used to teach anatomy.

And Hannah learned math:

"Mathematics" is not a Bible term, but "Counting" is so we use the term Counting. I found this discovery so liberating when Hannah was in Year 1 ("kindergarten"). Mathematics was too hard, but I could count. When I talk to people, I use the term mathematics so that they can understand me, but I really mean counting.

By Year 6, Hannah is learning about government:

Ezekiel: Prophet of the captivity continued (the temple) and completed; Barak Obama, despot; more rapid changes of U.S. government; crooked "czars" (no congressional oversight); almost complete capitulation of the minds of industrialized citizens worldwide; the complete takeover of despots…

With the Obama administration, mafia-types are in full view--although they've been around a long time in the U.S. government. Through the pleasure principle, false education, and dependency, Americans are big enough fools--and the powers have enough information control--for the thugs to come out boldly and ruthlessly suppress all opposition; talk of U.S. concentration camps and foreign troops arises once again.

Poor Hannah.

(via Stuff Fundies Like)


Permalink | Posted in Religion |

- Reader Comments -

Following are comments in response to this item.
The most recent comment is at the bottom.

  1. By meg_mac. Comment posted 28-Jan-2011 @09:37am:
    Americans are big enough fools--and the powers have enough information control--for the thugs to come out boldly and ruthlessly suppress all opposition; talk of U.S. concentration camps and foreign troops arises once again.

    Another Jared Loughner in training. This scares the beejezzus out of me. Hopefully when Hannah reaches her teens she will rebel.
  2. By Miss Cellania. Comment posted 28-Jan-2011 @09:51am:
    I can't tell what state they are in, but most of them have some kind of standards and curricula for home schoolers -even tests. Eventually, she'll have to explain why her kid isn't educated.

    About half of what she's teaching is stuff you are supposed to learn at home anyway, cooking, gardening, personal hygiene, and religion. The rest is full of holes!
  3. By Evil Klown. Comment posted 28-Jan-2011 @10:03am:
    meg mac: This scares the beejezzus out of me.

    You libs must live in a constant state of fear. You're always discovering scary things. WOoooooo - BOO!!!
  4. By L.. Comment posted 28-Jan-2011 @10:08am:
    that's child abuse, plain and simple
  5. By meg_mac. Comment posted 28-Jan-2011 @10:12am:
    EK... were you home schooled?
  6. By wally the duck. Comment posted 28-Jan-2011 @10:19am:
    EK... were you home schooled?
  7. By Harold Dola. Comment posted 28-Jan-2011 @10:19am:
    Good luck to her daughter on the SATs. Unless the fundamentalist colleges don't require them.
  8. By decibelcat. Comment posted 28-Jan-2011 @10:35am:
    I think the only thing a fundamentalist college requires is that the tuition check clears.
  9. By meg_mac. Comment posted 28-Jan-2011 @10:38am:
    tuition check clears.

    You also have to pass a very stringent litmus test. When did the world begin? Starts it off.
  10. By Tony. Comment posted 28-Jan-2011 @10:43am:
    I wonder what version of Excel Jesus used to keep track of everything. Is using DATEDIF() a sin?

    Guess I'd better go get me a bible, and not the heathen one J-Walk wrote.
  11. By J-Walk. Comment posted 28-Jan-2011 @10:48am:
    Here, she discusses some uses of urine:

    http://www.biblicalscholarship.net/urine.htm
  12. By J-Walk. Comment posted 28-Jan-2011 @10:52am:
  13. By meg_mac. Comment posted 28-Jan-2011 @11:00am:
    dabbing a little in the inside of my nostrils with a q-tip

    Save money on q-tips. Just don't wash your hands after you pee.
  14. By Tony. Comment posted 28-Jan-2011 @11:02am:
    Just don't wash your hands after you pee.


    And if you're male just work on your aim.
  15. By J-Walk. Comment posted 28-Jan-2011 @11:06am:
    And she's interested in the Tea Party movement:

    http://www.biblicalscholarship.net/warning.htm
  16. By LJW. Comment posted 28-Jan-2011 @11:10am:
    I think education reform needs to include home schooling practices. As a future older person, this worries me.
  17. By Rahntwo. Comment posted 28-Jan-2011 @11:38am:
    We home schooled our 3 for 8 or 9 years. But it wasn't anything like that. In Texas there is no oversight, no supervision, and no association with any school system unless you choose to. When our kids decided they wanted to go to public school, the boys started a grade higher than the other kids their age.
  18. By Rahntwo. Comment posted 28-Jan-2011 @11:40am:
    Trust me, this wacky weirdo is NOT the norm for home-school parents.
  19. By The Trivium. Comment posted 28-Jan-2011 @11:52am:
    I think equating home schooling with religion does home schooling a disservice.

    Many public schools in the United States are a complete mess. Some students have to be home schooled out of physical necessity; and some public schools, especially in very rural areas and inner cities, are so bad the best caring parents, who can’t afford private schools, can do for their children is home school.

    The issue your blog post points out has more to do with inappropriate religious interference when formulating a framework for basic education and less with the approach a parent selects to gift their child an education.

    Is it better when religious people impose their beliefs on others by asserting influence on school curriculums?
  20. By Taco Jocko. Comment posted 28-Jan-2011 @12:02pm:
    In Texas there is no oversight, no supervision, and no association with any school system unless you choose to.

    This is true. But the way our State Board of Education is run these days, it's getting difficult to tell the difference between her blog and the public school textbooks.
  21. By meg_mac. Comment posted 28-Jan-2011 @12:18pm:
    especially in very rural areas and inner cities, are so bad the best caring parents, who can’t afford private schools, can do for their children is home school.

    While I agree with your point in general I have to disagree with this statement. Rural areas and inner cities are not where you find most home schooling,rather you will find them in suburbs where people have money and time and want to influence their children with their particular beliefs.
    Physical neccessity maybe. Although most challenged children are now mainstreamed. Your point about influence falls a little too short. Check out Texas.
    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/03/13/education/13texas.html
  22. By The Trivium. Comment posted 28-Jan-2011 @12:42pm:
    meg_mac,

    I don't know about every place, especially suburbs, but I know about parts of NYC and rural Tennessee. In some schools in NYC, sending your child to public school is like sending them to join a gang. And in Tennessee, there were people teaching at the High School who never attended college. Sometimes, home schooling is the only way out of ignorance and it doesn't involve religion.

    Besides, where you find most home schooling is not relevant to the point that equating home schooling with religion is an unfair over-generalization.

    And by physical, I didn't mean handicapped. I was home schooled because I was needed at home to help out. It beats dropping out.

    Your citation argues my point. Home schooling gives poor people the chance to select an education other than the one imposed by the state. Rich people can opt for private schools.
  23. By Evil Klown. Comment posted 28-Jan-2011 @12:49pm:
    In those early days, all we had was the scriptures, a tambourine, and a hymn book.

    Don't you people recognize satire when you see it?
  24. By meg_mac. Comment posted 28-Jan-2011 @12:50pm:
    The Trivium... Thank you for your reply. I am not convinced of your argument but do accept that public schools are in trouble. People who opt out of the public schools instead of working to better them are actually exacerbating the problem imho. People who I know who are homeschooling do it because they want to teach their children creationism. I accept you know others who don't.
  25. By banjo brad. Comment posted 28-Jan-2011 @01:00pm:
    Before Hannah was 6.5 years old, I knew that her schooling was essentially complete (Year 2 of formal school). Subsequent years have proven this to be true.


    I believe that's true. I feel sorry for Hannah when she has to go out into reality.
  26. By Bisbonian. Comment posted 28-Jan-2011 @01:32pm:
    Barak Obama, despot; more rapid changes of U.S. government; crooked "czars" (no congressional oversight); almost complete capitulation of the minds of industrialized citizens worldwide; the complete takeover of despots…


    I'm guessing poor Hannah hasn't gotten as far as Romnas yet:

    Romans 13:1 Let every soul be subject unto the higher powers. For there is no power but of God: the powers that be are ordained of God.

    2 Whosoever therefore resisteth the power, resisteth the ordinance of God: and they that resist shall receive to themselves damnation. (KJV)
  27. By Bisbonian. Comment posted 28-Jan-2011 @01:35pm:
    Titus 2:1 & 2 "Remind them to be subject to rulers, to authorities, to be obedient, to be ready for every good deed, to malign no one, to be uncontentious, gentle, showing every consideration for all men."


    1 Peter 2:13-17 "Submit yourselves for the Lord's sake to every human institution, whether to a king as the one in authority, or to governors as sent by him for the punishment of evildoers and the praise of those who do right. For such is the will of God that by doing right you may silence the ignorance of foolish men. Act as free men, and do not use your freedom as a covering for evil, but use it as bondslaves of God. Honor all men; love the brotherhood, fear God, honor the king."


    1 Timothy 2:1-2 "First of all, then, I urge that entreaties and prayers, petitions and thanksgivings be made on behalf of all men, for Kings and all who are in authority, in order that we may lead a tranquil and quiet life in all godliness and dignity."

    Yep, poor Hannah's education is lacking.
  28. By meg_mac. Comment posted 28-Jan-2011 @02:04pm:
    God hates haters.
  29. By Rahntwo. Comment posted 28-Jan-2011 @02:07pm:
    Does that mean G d hates H mself?
  30. By Don Coyote. Comment posted 28-Jan-2011 @03:11pm:
    This is a case of Jesus on a dinosaur Ham-schooling not home-schooling. Poor child.
  31. By Spokane Mary. Comment posted 28-Jan-2011 @03:32pm:
    It's very common for fundie fanatics to homeschool their children, but that doesn't mean that all - even the majority - of children who are homeschooled are done so by religious fanatics. That just doesn't wash, even though it's certainly easy to find examples like Hannah on the internet.

    From Wikipedia:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homeschooling:
    A study at Wheaton College in Illinois showed that the freshmen that were homeschooled for high school scored fifty-eight points higher on their SAT scores than those students who attended public or private schools.

    On average, homeschooled children score eighty-one points higher than the national average on the SAT scores.[citation needed]

    And this list of people who were homeschooled might surprise you: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_homeschooled_people

    Ansel Adams, Irving Berlin, Andrew Carnegie, Robert Frost, Albert Einstein, George Bernard Shaw, Douglas MacArthur, Frank Lloyd Wright, Mark Twain ...
  32. By Tony. Comment posted 28-Jan-2011 @06:25pm:
    And this list of people who were homeschooled might surprise you


    Given that list is ancient history, it doesn't surprise me the least.

    When did public schools become widespread? How about a list of people past that that date?
  33. By J-Walk. Comment posted 28-Jan-2011 @06:35pm:
    It's very common for fundie fanatics to homeschool their children, but that doesn't mean that all - even the majority - of children who are homeschooled are done so by religious fanatics.

    I don't think anyone is saying that. I'm just pointing out how one very stupid woman created a (probably) very screwed-up kid by homeschooling her.

    If parents are qualified and have the time, homeschooling could be a great way to go. But it can also lead to disasters like this.
  34. By Greg7079. Comment posted 28-Jan-2011 @07:02pm:
    Is she Catholic or Evangelical... I don't get it
    "Nicolaus Copernicus (1473-1543)
    In his heretical work, De Revolutionibus Orbium Coelestium, Nicolaus Copernicus put the sun at the center of the solar system"
    I just perused the site briefly. I felt the devil had a hold of me when I was reading it... like he was trying to possess me.
  35. By meg_mac. Comment posted 28-Jan-2011 @07:28pm:
    Nothing that we've learned has been truly based on the Bible so all of our knowledge is based on false, destroyed foundations. What do you think that this does to a person mentally? He walks around deceived while thinking that he has knowledge. The more of this kind of education that a person has, the more of a fool he is.

    Looney Tunes!!
  36. By christopher. Comment posted 28-Jan-2011 @07:36pm:
    this is why America is F'kd up.
  37. By Lonnie. Comment posted 28-Jan-2011 @11:57pm:
    Meg mac:
    My autistic nephew is home schooled because not only does the one public school within 40 miles have a huge gang problem, the school doesn't have enough of anything to keep going. For example - the school doesn't have toilet paper for the bathrooms (students have to bring their own) or enough lightbulbs (some classes rely solely on daylight). If he had attended this year, he would be competing with 36 other students in his classroom for 20 desks and 15 textbooks.

    If you were a parent, would you want to wait to see if over the course of the next few years you could help change that system, knowing that parents before you had tried for years to no avail because the government and town just don't have the money, or would you find homeschooling to be the better option for your child? I mean really. What would you do, if you couldn't afford to move?

    In this rural area, almost half of the kids homeschool. I'd hate to see what the numbers are for suburban areas.
  38. By Bhuffalo Bhil. Comment posted 29-Jan-2011 @05:53am:
    Trivium,

    Unless you're well over 100 years old, there is no one teaching anywhere in the US that is without a college degree, let alone "never attended college." I'd really like to know where you got that bit of "knowledge".

    Bhil
  39. By meg_mac. Comment posted 29-Jan-2011 @06:58am:
    Lonnie.... see my comment #24
    People who I know who are homeschooling do it because they want to teach their children creationism. I accept you know others who don't.
  40. By meg_mac. Comment posted 29-Jan-2011 @07:07am:
    knowing that parents before you had tried for years to no avail because the government and town just don't have the money,

    What have they done? Start a cooperative? Clean the gangs up? Donate time and money? Vote for a bond to help the schools?. Got to Costco and buy lightbulbs for the school? I would be interested to know what school district it was?
    Start a fund for books and desks? If everyone pitched in 100 bucks a year? Whose responsibility is it to maintain the schools for our children? If you opt out then you are hurting all the rest of the students.
  41. By Mean Jean. Comment posted 29-Jan-2011 @07:55am:
    Volunteer to work at the school. Help clean/repair on weekends. Be a teacher's aide. Be a hall monitor. When my daughter was in elementary school funds for aides were cut so the moms showed up 2-3 days a week 3-4 hours a day, in some cases all day.
  42. By Wendy!. Comment posted 29-Jan-2011 @05:03pm:
    Wow that website sure has a lot of words!
  43. By Lonnie. Comment posted 29-Jan-2011 @07:10pm:
    Meg mac; The school is in California, which is one of the worst states when it comes to educational funding. I have no idea how one cleans up gangs outside of trying to provide as much prevention information and discouraging that behavior within the families and schools, which they’ve done. Parents have donated time and as much money as they can - there's no costco or sams club in the area, but certain families do try to buy enough toilet paper and light bulbs to last for a few weeks. The school has a fund for books and desks, but unfortunately, it's not a very big fund and the school tends to opt to spend it elsewhere (like security due to the gangs or paychecks to afford more teachers since many quit). Most families in this area don't have 100 bucks to give up or would rather spend it buying textbooks directly online for their child and then donating to them to the school when the year is done.
  44. By Tony. Comment posted 29-Jan-2011 @07:11pm:
    Wow that website sure has a lot of words!


    And all in English, just as God & Jesus intended - http://www.biblicalscholarship.net/classroom.htm
  45. By Lonnie. Comment posted 29-Jan-2011 @07:18pm:
    However, some tend to then contemplate purchasing homeschooling textbooks instead (which can be cheaper). The cooperative (I take it you mean a non profit school that also focuses on real-life job skills) has become the home schooling community. I hear what you’re saying about the “if you don’t do anything, it won’t make anything better”, I really do and it's a valid point, but the problem is that most people care about their child’s educational benefit in the terms of the immediate. They don’t want to wait years trying to get the system to get better.

    Discouragement is a downward spiral in these scenarios. Think of email vs. mail. Email is invented, stamp prices go up, which encourages more people to email, so less people mail, stamps continue to rise. So should people mail when they could email so that stamp prices remain cheaper? Schools get bad due to low funding, people choose to homeschool, so schools get worse, and more people homeschool. Downward spiral.
  46. By Spokane Mary. Comment posted 29-Jan-2011 @07:41pm:
    Lonnie, do you really want help for this school or are you just comfortable with the "everything's hopeless" attitude?

    California is a BIG state and I know they're having a heckuva lot of trouble funding their schools, but I'm absolutely certain that not every school in California is in such dire straits as yours. So what's the deal? Is every school in your county suffering the same way, or just yours? How many students are in this school? How many classrooms, how many teachers?

    There are many good ideas given in the posts by meg mac and Mean Jean above, but the bottom line is: Does anyone care enough to bother actually getting involved? I would add a couple of suggestions to the above:

    Go on Craigslist, to the Wanted column, and put in a request for school desks - describe your shortage; school desks show up on there all the time. Ask for donations for the school. Also put a "Wanted" post in your local Nickel paper and the newspaper.
  47. By Spokane Mary. Comment posted 29-Jan-2011 @07:52pm:
    Be a squeaky wheel: Call your local TV news station, or a reporter who does human interest stories for the TV News or the local newspaper. Get the story out there - if people don't know about it, they can't do anything about it.

    But the biggest responsibility is still going to land in the lap of the parents; it's their kids who are getting shafted in the education department and they're the ones who have to band together to do something about it. Parents can arrange to pick up and recycle newspapers and donate the money to pay for textbooks; that's what our school did to pay for transportation for the band and orchestra to be able to travel to other schools for competitions, etc. Parents of the kids in sports had fundraisers of their own, also. Parent/grandparent volunteers contributed their precious time - which meant the kids could have programs they couldn't have otherwise.

    Please fight this. Do what has to be done. You only have to get involved and push a little.
  48. By Tony. Comment posted 30-Jan-2011 @12:03am:
    You only have to get involved...


    But that means I'd have to get off the couch, put my pants on... I'm mean I'm only one person and gosh, I'd probably have to go outside and all and maybe even talk to people...

    Complaining is just so much easier, and let's face it, someone has to do that...

    Reminds me of this: http://j-walkblog.com/index.php?/weblog/comments/29860

    Let's all just pray for the schools instead. Yay!
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